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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
, super storm sandy made landfall in my part of the united states. its impact up and down the east coast were devastating and heartbreaking. new york, new jersey, parts of new england were hit particularly hard. in delaware, we did not experience the level of devastation that was inflicted on our neighbors to the north and to the east, but our state did receive significant damage. in total, there were over 200 detectives attributed to superstorm sandy. today we remem remember the lives lost and those forever impacted by this storm. as i travel through delaware during and after the storm i saw some of the massive impacts of that storm firsthand. but i saw something else as well. i saw people from all walks of life pulling together, helping one another and taking care of their neighbors. the impacts of that superstorm are still fresh in my mind today as we continue to rebuild. in delaware, new jersey, in new york, and other places up the east coast. but not only are the impacts of the superstorm still fresh in my mind, something else is as well and that is this: the extraordinary efforts o
and tried to get ready. hurricane sandy was on the way up, up from the caribbean, to the east coast. seeming huge and mercilessly. we have experienced a lot of hurricanes in this country, but for sheer size, sandy was without precedent. sandy was the largest single storm system to ever form in the atlantic ocean. and it was aiming for the most densely populated part of the united states. it was aiming for our nation's largest cities. and that city, rates like all the others to get ready for this gigantic storm. new york sent out evacuation orders for people living in flood zones, they built sandbag walls at office buildings. they shut down the subway system. they locked the door to grand central terminal. but for all the desperate measures to protect from the great state of new york, there was one place they needed to protect maybe most desperately of all. this is harlem. this is the end of the number three train line, one of the red ones on the map, if you visit and if you do visit, you should use that line, you can go up and see harlem. ive you zoom out and look at that station on the map,
hurricane sandy hit the northeast and people are still dealing with insurance claims to clean up of hurricane sandy estimated to be around $65 billion. u.n. officials confirm an outbreak of polio and syria the first in 14 years. there are ten confirmed cases, most of those tested are babies and toddlers. last week the u.s. launched a campaign to immunize 2.5 million children against polio and other diseases. those are the headlines here on al jazeera. real money with ali velshi is next. >> we've all heard if you like your plan you can keep it. not so fast. while millions who already buy their own health insurance are sick over what obamacare could do to their bottom line. just in time for the holidays one expert said the consumer landscape is the land mediocrity. and i'm ali velshi, this is "real money." >> this is real money. join our live conversation for the next half hour on twitter at aj real money. close to a month in and the roll out of obamacare insurance agencies is off to a very bad start. to all those who tried and using the government's website an apologizapologycharg
. >>> it's been one year since super storm sandy battered the northeast. and still communities are trying to pick up the pieces. the damage up the east coast was catastrophic. mostly in new jersey and new york. at least 140 people died. over half a million homes destroyed and 50 billion worth of damage. >>> and there was extensive damage here in maryland from sandy. we're live with complete coverage. jessica kartalija takes a closer look at the damage and recovery. and meteorologist chelsea ingram looks at the storm's impact. jessicjessica is live at fells point to begin our coverage. >> reporter: good evening, kai. good evening to everyone. we all remember it very well. and thank goodness, things look a lot differently than they did a year ago. today and tomorrow. but kai, as you mentioned, people are still strug lin to -- struggling to rebuild throughout maryland. >> reporter: the first anniversary of sandy. >> this is the highest i've seen the tide up in my lifetime. we went down here about a half hour ago. and we had to turn around. >> reporter: it hit the state with record-breaking w
again see visitors again. ellis island was closed for almost a year because of super storm sandy. more than 1 million photographs remain in storage while buildings are being fixed and upgraded. >> super storm sandy does not play favorites destroying everything from new york city to small towns on the coast. after it was all said and done sandy left 24 states impacted and counties and 8 states in puerto rico were disaster areas. craig has more. >> good morning to you. the waterfront along long island was about 6 and a half billion in damage. we are here in long beach where there's a $44 million project that struck up and down the east coast. will it was new york and emergency emergency that took the brunt of it. >> a major hit beach homes to the powerful storm surge. >> the house was still standing. >> beach lots found empty and crossroads as they look for the share of hard to come by federal relief. so far it received 300,000 dollars. >> please places are gone and they are not coming back. there's so much history these were indian reservations. there's a lot here we need to preserve fo
of superstorm sandy. today new jersey governor chris christie responded to critics who charged the pace of recovery is too slow. he blamed the federal government. christie told the associated press, quote, to the victims i would say you're right i think is too slow. and i wish the federal government would allow us the flexibility to get you the aid more quickly. sandy also slammed new york city where plenty of rebuilding still needs to be done. especially neighborhoods barely above sea level. terrell brown tonight takes a look at lessons learned. >> reporter: last october superstorm sandy swept joe courtney's home off its foundation. though he knew it would be expensive to repair, he had no intention of leaving new york's rockaway beach. >> there was not a question of whether we were going to rebuild or not. this is where i grew up. this is where my wife grew up. and this is where our lives are. >> reporter: his new home will be higher with a 14 foot concrete foundation. flood vents will allow high water to pass through. >> going upstairs in the attic there in that dormer. hot water hea
of superstorm sandy. today, we remember those who lost their lives during this catastrophe and salute those who continue the rebuilding efforts. one year ago, sandy ravaged the east coast, producing devastating floods and widespread power outages, disrupting cellular phone networks and transit networks. as a whole, the renal suffered over $65 billion in economic losses. families lost their homes, their precious momentos and reminders of their daily lives. communities lost their businesses and tragically, some individuals lost their lives. while the east coast was a primary victim of sandy, extreme weather knows no boundaries. other communities around our country are not immune from suffering the same fate. floods, hurricanes, wildfires and droughts are becoming all too common, all too intense and all too costly. these events will continue to wreak economic havoc and uproot families unless we take meaningful action to address climate change. in california, climate change is increasing the frequency of extreme heat and prolonged drought, placing millions of californians at greater risk of public
the east coast marking a somber anniversary. one year ago superstorm sandy slammed ashore. hundreds of people in new york and new jersey homeless still. insurance payments have been averaging $55,000 a family. that $60 billion relief package passed in january cannot come soon enough. >>> millions of people across europe are trying to come to grips with widespread damage left by one of the worst storms in years. deadly winds and waves hammering one country after another left hundreds of thousands of people in the dark. >> reporter: the storm named st. jude, the patron saint of lost causes, has left a devastating mark with more than a dozen killed. the heart of london a crane buckling under the wind, collapsing. the building below evacuated. the deputy prime minister forced to call off a news conference. hundreds of trees uprooted, blocking roads and railway tracks. the gas lines of this home exploding. the storm marched in to northern europe. tossing trucks and snarling trains in the netherlands. in germany the audubon closed. the winds reaching 120 miles an hour in denmark. the stor
year since hurricane sandy hit the east coast. the super storm was one of the most damaging and most expensive to ever hit the u.s. businesses were decimated. many still have not reopened. merchants in one neighborhood hosted a block party to spur revival in the area. one of the businesses that has reopened, and she joins me now. diana. thank you for being with us. congratulations on being open. how long were you closed for? >> well, first of all i want to say happy birthday and thank you for having me on your show. >> that's a good birthday gift for me. >> thank you very much. we were closed for about three months. >> tell me what happened. >> as i understand it, your place had been renovated six months before the hurricane hit? >> yes, six months before the hurricane hit we had done a total renovation were top to bottom, brand new equipment, brand new everything. the storm hit and wiped everything out. >> what kind of damage did it do? i understand that you had a lot of water in there? >> a lot of damage doesn't begin to explain it. we had a 12-foot tidal wave over the top of the b
coa coast>> ainsley, patti ann, good morning to you. it seems like a year since super storm sandy impacted the east coast impacting 24 states where we are standing here. there was a huge set back months later after the storm came through. the disrecovery process is ongoing. >> part of that include a massive buyout plan. they will knock down homes in sandy affected communities and offering residents prestorm value in their home. staten island is the first area to be bought out. >> i signed the papers, accepted their offer. they have been more than fair. >> in the ocean breeze section of staten island the neighborhood remains mostly deserted bud they are vowing to rebuild. >> a year later they are under repair no kitchen, no bathroom, this room is painted and the floor went down a year later. we have a long way to go. >> along jersey shore in seaside heights they began to rebuild only to suffer a major set back. it may have been compromised water and sand we have the time lapse of putting it back together a rush to get this boardwalk together where we are standing and still in a por
being made in new york one year after sandy, right? >> it would be the first state to do this. you have heard of these big vats and vessels full of oil in the gulf region that america's strategic petroleum reserve. this would be the first state, new york, having a gasoline reserve on long island, about a $10 million pilot program to make sure what happened last year doesn't happen again. four days after sandy as you well know, poppy, 60% to 65% of the gas stations were not working. they were either not working because they didn't have generators that could pump the gas or they literally did not have the gas. there's already been one pilot program to make sure you're getting generators to some of these smaller gas stations. this is the next step to make sure there are supplies available. andrew cuomo wants to do this, $10 million on the front end. no state has done something like this before, but when you think about new york and where it's situated and how this happened a year ago in recent memory, a stronger storm or a storm of a different path could do the same thing all over again, t
hope you put up with me. chuck and michael steele stay with us if you can. up next superstorm sandy one year later. we revisit one of the hardest hit areas. plus senator chuck schumer on what's still need in the recovery efforts. in the coming addition joe will be taking part in a series of events to mark the upcoming publication of his brand new book "the right path." it's the right time for this book. it scares me, actually. things kick off on monday november 11th at columbia university the miller theater there. he'll sit down with jon meacham. you can get free admission by emailing your name and he mail address at seejoe @nbcuni.com. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's
this race. christie is simply too popular, thanks in part to his definite handling of hurricane sandy last year. democrats could have prevented christie from the sort of massive victory that he could use as a springboard for a 2016 presidential run. christie's campaign has not even tried to disguise that they want to run up the margins in this race so they can tell every republican who will listen that the state who re-elected barack obama by 17 points turned around the next year and backed chris christie by an even bigger margin. democrats could have denied him that. they could have worked to keep buono close, to keep christie from gaining momentum, from a massive victory in a blue state. instead, christie has built a 33-point lead without putting up any real fight on the democratic side. and that could come back to haunt them once 2016 rolls around. joining me now is e.j. dionne, a "washington post" columnist and author of "our divided political heart: the battle for the american idea in an age of discontent." e.j., thanks for joining us tonight. i appreciate it. and i'm just sort of thi
marathon. the race was cancelled last year because of superstorm sandy. >> those are the head lines, "real money" with ali velshi is up next. why howard buffet, son of one of the world's richest men prefers blue jeans and a corn field to suits and ties in a boardroom. i'm ali velshi, this is "real money" >> this is "real money", you are the important part of the show. tell us what you think. the roll out of obamacare insurance exchanges is off to a bad start. you know that. newly released documents reveal a handful of people signed up for insurance on 1st october the the day they opened for business. by the second day it was 248. to those that tried and failed to sign up using the government's website, everyone from president obama himself to health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius has apologised for the website's problems and vowed to fix it. we are hearing conflicting reports about what went wrong with the roll out. cgi, the contractor developing the site may have warned the obama administration that it would not be ready tro go live on october 1st. we know the administrati
seaboard were ravaged by superstorm sandy. entire communities were shattered. families were torn apart, and lives were lost. in new york city, the water level was so high it was covering cars. the nation's largest and busiest mass transit system closed down for the first time in a century. 8 1/2 million people lost their power and some still do not have it returned, and 125 americans lost their lives. the gratitude i feel for all those who help their friends and neighbors is hard to express. there are a great number of we sorely heroans and needed them. fema has approved over $3.2 billion in funding for emergency work. over $1.4 billion in assistance to over 182,000 survivors. the small business administration has approved $2.4 billion in low interest loans, and the national flood insurance program has provided more than $7.9 billion to policyholders. i would like to thank all of my colleagues and all those who stepped up to help during these difficult times. new york and others are deeply grateful. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose
one year since superstorm sandy roared up the east coast. the storm destroyed the jet star roller coaster in seaside heights, new jersey, as you can see there parked in the ocean for awhile. now the site is empty. there is nothing but sand and surf. that is where craig boswell joins us. craig, one year and a lot of cleaning up but still a lot more to do. >> reporter: a ton to do. it's all about recovery and rebuilding. the landscape was completely redefined a year ago when superstorm sandy roared up the east coast and came up ashore. here where we are in seaside heights, there was this massive rush to rebuild the boardwalk. where we're standing they got it done by may so they could try to be open for that summer season and get tourists back in here. this is a huge destination here when this population swells and they come to seaside heights and seaside park. then last month in september a massive six-alarm fire that started in a shop to spread along the boardwalk, took out almost 60 businesses. i'm standing where the fire line ripped up part of the boardwalk. huge blow to this are
the superstorm sandy that hit one year ago tomorrow devastating the coastlines of new york and new jersey. today's reopening is sign of progress as the area still struggles to rebuild. rick leventhal joins us live from ellis island with this part of the story. rick, people probably didn't realize how much damage was done >> reporter: right, jenna. sandy buried all of he will is island underwater and all the mechanicals were in the basement so all the mechanicals got crashed -- trashed. that included the entire electrical system for this historic island, heating and air-conditioning, water and sewage lines an telephone lines were damaged. the ferry house was destroyed and some of the exhibits. most of the one million valuable historical items and documents and photos did survive the storm. >> fortunately the floodwaterrers did not get on to the first, second, or third floors. the artifacts and our exhibits remained intact. however because we had no heat, no air-conditioning, because we had no climate control, we had to move the artifacts they're still down in maryland. >> reporter: the first and
of superstorm sandy devastating damage in the new york and new jersey area. remember the huge lines to get gas? this was so insulting to people who were trying to get back to work and you couldn't even get gas. happy to hear for those people that new york's governor andrew cuomo is going to create a strategic gasoline reserve. the ones who had gas quickly ran out of fuel and couldn't get stuff in. like the nation has a strategic gas reserve. >> an effort that may be helpful. we will watch it. >>> coming up a statewide manhunt going on in oklahoma. hour four convicts managed to break out of a prison that was considered absolutely escape proof. >> a lot going on this morning. >>> the british phone hacking trial finally getting under way in london. eight people facing charges, including a former huge media executive. why this case could drag on until easter. huh...fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know the ancient pyramids were actually a mistake? uh-oh. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. wout of
heartburn. >>> after a one-year absence because of superstorm sandy and under very heavy security kenyan runner geoffrey mutai wins the new york city marathon once again. a record number of runners, close to 51,000 starting today's race. the 26.2 mile course lined with bomb sniffing dogs, 1500 surveillance cameras, radiation detectors, you name it. the unprecedented layer of security all the result of the deadly bombing at the boston marathon back in april that killed three people and wounded hundreds more. >>> getting new reaction now to the technical glitches, if you can really call it that, plaguing the obama care website. healthcare.gov taken down once again for maintenance overnight. and as it went back online this morning both lawmakers on both sides of the aisle took to the sunday talk shows today saying that the site should be taken offline until all of the bugs are worked out. listen to this. >> i felt, and i said this directly to the president's chief of staff, that it ought to take down the website until it was right. they believe that they need to keep it running, and that th
, ellis island is set to reopen a year after being submerged by super storm sandy. >> now more from ellis island, big doings there today, stacy. >> reporter: yeah, big day here today. 9:30, the first boat will arrive with visitors. for more than a year, when sandy came through almost one year to the date, it completely flooded ellis island. eight feet of water washed through the main hall here, it destroyed the electrical system. it destroyed the boilers. so things have been pretty out of commission. but finally they are able to open it to the public today. it is not all the way there. there is still a lot of work to be done because workers here, before this storm, had taken all of the artifacts, a lot of photographs and moved it to higher ground. right after the storm, when everything was flooded, they removed it all to storage warehouses. that stuff has not been brought back because right now, ellis island is still running on interim power and heat. so still about six to eight months out from ellis island being totally back to normal. back to you. >> stacy, live. how can does it take to
brooks and sandy corson right at the heart of it. that huge tension that exists between the need for a free press and the swairn sometimes t free develop can be abused. >>> there are six other defendants, the charges which all deny, include conspiracy to intercept communications and the conspiracy to interrupt the course of justice. the trial could go on until next april. >>> a big cleanup in the u.k. after a severe storm battl battd parts of the country. 200,000 households lost power. lawrence lee has the latest. >> the worst storm in britain for the last several years had its presence known even on government. a crane toppled onto the roof of the parliament. they all had to reschedule their time tables. most of the damage happened overnight between sunday and monday. off the south coast there were imaged winds strong enough to be where classified as hurricane speed. a 14-year-old boy was swept away. another teenager died when a tree fell onto the family care van. you would think a camping holiday wouldn't have been the wisest idea. >> the first hit the tent in an angle that see
as strong as sandy to endanger maryland's coastline. >> wjz reveals some parts of maryland will literally be underwater. >> maryland's fragile coastline is vanishing. each wave, each high tide carries a little more land back into the water. >> there are fewer and fewer days that we have much of the beach at all. >> placed the blame on climate change. wjz finds the ripple effects causing the sea level to rise in maryland at an alarming rate. >> what is interesting about maryland is that sea level rise is occurring three times faster than that of other locations. >> denise half is watching property disappearing before her eyes. hurricane isabel 10 years ago broke apart her bulkhead and now every storm steals more of her land. >> this is the type of eruption we would get without a bulkhead. it's just gradually working its way back. >> maryland has the first longest coastline in the united states which adds up to more than 3000 miles vulnerable to rising water. >> here in maryland the coastline is thinking while sea level is rising. >> wjz obtained these maps showing how much land would be lo
. >>> nearly a year after hurricane sandy tore through new jersey and new york, parts of a key landmark set to reopen today. parts of ellis island will be opened. visitors will be welcomed back to the halls of the immigrant wall of honor, the immigration museum will remain closed through the spring while a new electric am system is installed. remembrances continue to pour in for legendary rock pioneer lou reed dead at the age of 71. he was a founding member of the velvet underground sunday is widely credited with changing the landscape in the '70s. he wrote and recorded dozens and dozens of songs in his tremendous career. we'll talk more about that coming up. what a tremendous career when you think of all the influences. we'll get into it. >> and he was young, a loss on many levels. >> 71. yeah. >> thanks, mikaela. let's go straight over to ingrid petersen for a look at the temperatures. >> temperatures are bounding up to the 60s. above average. the average is typically in the upper 50s right now. this is only going to last one day, though. we have another cold front swinging through the no
and how this affects public safety. the case of trayvon martin like sandy hook massacre -- mr. chairman i requested hearings on this matter as member of the house judiciary committee that receive no response from the chairman. examining the "stand your ground" law's and whether they make our communities safer or less safe is critically important as part of a larger emanation of the impact of gun violence on america. sadly we lose a classroom full of kids every day to gun violence across this country and there have been no hearings in the house so senator durbin i applaud you for your leadership and for holding this hearing are the fundamental problem is americans are so afraid of other americans that they feel they must arm themselves. the gum lobby is pursuing to reshape our laws to make this practice more socially and legally acceptable. special interest are relaxing our laws resulting in an escalation of the deadliness of these confrontations. i've never believed allowing more guns will mean less gun violence. we must confront the deadly combination on easily available guns. we must ex
this year it could be special for them since the race was canceled last year because of sandy. thanks for being there for us, brian. keep us posted. >> of course, thanks. >>> obamacare will be front and center on capitol hill this coming week. as for the americans who are losing health care insurance coverage, well the numbers are growing even as the white house defends the program. >> at least 15 million including people in the small business community. they are talk about the individual market now and many small business people will lose their plans too. >>> welcome back, everyone. they are calling themselves the obamacare losers. it is a new political group made up of some of the millions of americans whose insurance was canceled or will be canceled in the week of the health carrollout. health care rollout. it is an issue that lead to an exchange between kathleen sebelius 1k3* congresswoman marcia blackburn last weekend. listen. >> insurance companies can sell the -- cancel the individual policies. they are one-year contracts with individuals. they are not lifetime plans and they a
is open again do visitors after being inundated by superstorm sandy. more than a million photos and other artifacts that document the arrival of millions of immigrants remain in storage. >> conrad murray is a free man as i speak. he was released from the los angeles county jail this morning after serving two years for causing michael jackson's death. the jury found dr. murray's negligence led to the singer's death from an overdose of propofol. murray's medical licenses were also suspended after his conviction, but he plans to file for reinstatement. he wants to practice medicine again. >>> and scientists are calling it the lost world in this remote mountain range in northern australia. pretty incredible discovery. take a look. three new species, sitting in isolation for million of years. a primitive looking gecko, a prehistoric reptile with huge eyes, and then there's this. you're looking at a frog with a behavior never seen before. this little guy, really, guys? somehow they know this about this frog, that he likes to make love in the rain. i'm going to take their word for it. finally, a
next week. they will return after the veterans day holiday. sandy is joining us from phoenix, arizona. you say this is not the land of opportunity. why is that? caller: it used to be. people could start up a business and thrive. friend opened up a cigarette store. you could go in and make it -- and make your own cigarettes a lot cheaper, half the price of a regular pack. i guess the big companies did not like it. they decided to take it to court and sue it -- and sue them. now they have this electric cigarette that they companies -- that big companies do not like either. they are going to tax them out of business. arizona, big mesa they have thousands of cars completely wasted and crushed. host: thank you for the call. a political note from the hill -- paper an ad is airing tomorrow that uses past statements, slamming charlie crist. he was once theory governor of florida as a republican. he will enter as a democrat after filing the necessary paperwork on friday. details online at the hill.com. our newsmakers program is focusing on the farm bill with tom vill sack -- with tom vill ilsa
are gone. my successor and elected insurance republican commissioner sandy kraeger and i worked on a whole series of plans to expand coverage. i did work on these issues and we were not necessary -- >> you say these were lousy plans and miss tavenner said no true insurance. do you think the plans weren't true insurance? >> in the individual market, the insurance commissioner in kansas and virtually every place in the country -- >> it's a yes -- >> it's a yes or no question. were they true insurance plans? >> a lot of them are not true insurance plans, no. >> i yield back. >> gentleman from vermont. >> i'm going to summarize what i've been hearing. number one, the website must be fixed. you've been very forthright and you're going to fix it. number two, we've had a real battle about health care, had a battle in this congress. it was passed and the president signed it and the supreme court affirmed it, a brutal battle. there was an election people where the american people affirmed it and then the shut down in the threat of deabt default. all of us represent people who are going to win or lo
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)